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May 16, 2019 318

Diario 1_12 - Cannes

DIARIO 01, ISSUE 12

Cannes
Outside the Festival

Being in Cannes for the 72nd Film Festival is a great opportunity to visit the Côte d’Azur’s hidden gems, including the modernist house of designer and artist Eileen Gray.

Bonjour Tristesse (1958), directed by Otto Preminger. Film poster, designed by Saul Bass.

The Cannes Film Festival, along with New York and Berlin, is still considered one of the triumvirate festivals for all things film. However, it can be seen as the most iconic of the three as it is spread over the course of two weeks. Initiated in 1946, the festival was founded “to draw attention to and raise the profile of films, with the aim of contributing towards the development of cinema, boosting the film industry worldwide and celebrating cinema at an international level.” This year the 72nd annual festival takes place from the 14th to the 25th of May. 

Behind the scenes at Bonjour Tristesse 1957 © Jean Seberg

Roger Vadim and Annette Stroyberg, Saint Tropez 1958 © Willy Rizzo

The Côte d’Azur is a striking stretch of land where you can find over-the-top opulence living side by side with the charming villages that attracted artists and intellectuals and made this portion of the French Riviera a veritable art Mecca. Painters and sculptors were the first to call this place home. Pablo Picasso explored his passion for pottery when living in the clay-quarrying town of Vallarius where he also painted its main chapel, while Henri Matisse spent his last years in Nice and built a chapel of his own in nearby Vence. Nice has much to offer including the Musee Matisse, which houses an extensive permanent collection of the painter’s paintings, drawings, sculptures and personal items, and the Musee Chagall which was designed by the artist himself houses his series of 17 paintings illustrating the Message Biblique

Apart from the artists, the area also attracted many writers, movie stars and socialites in the 20th century. The first wave, post World War I, included Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Nabokov, James Joyce, Gerald and Sara Murphy, and Coco Chanel. The second wave, post World War II, brought in the glitz and glamour of Hollywood, turning the artist and intellectual retreat into a playground for the rich and famous. Brigitte Bardot, Roger Vadim, Jane Fonda, Jane Birkin, and Serge Gainsbourg are only a few examples of the glamorous crowd that spent time on the sunny coast along with royalty and politicians, helping turn it into the opulent destination it is today.

La danseuse créole, Henri Matisse, Musée Matisse, Nice, 1965

Elijah on a chariot, Marc Chagall (1961), mosaic installed on a wall outside the installation of the Biblical Message paintings, Museo Nazionale Marc Chagall (Marc Chagall National Museum), Nice, France

A ceramic mosaic by Fernand Léger from 1952 adorns the terrace of the "Colombe d'Or". © La Colombe d'Or

A mobile sculpture by Alexander Calder at La Colombe d'Or © Bernadette Marie

A short drive from the more recognizable destinations of Nice, Cannes, and St. Tropez, lies the small town of Saint Paul de Vence where you will find La Colombe d’Or. The rustically charming, family-run inn opened in 1931, first as a restaurant then a hotel. Artists were regulars here and donated masterpieces to adorn its humble premises in exchange for meals or lodging: works by Picasso, Matisse, Calder, Léger, Miró, and Chagall were donated by the artists and are displayed without fanfare. Though it began as a haven for artists, the boutique hotel quickly became popular with the stars as well, such as Brigitte Bardot, François Truffaut, Orson Welles, Charlie Chaplin, and David Niven.

The nearby Fondation Maeght, created in 1964 by art dealers Marguerite and Aimé Maeght, houses one of the largest art collections in Europe. The building was designed by Spanish architect Josep Lluís Sert as an interpretation of a Mediterranean village. Behind the small entrance gate you will find a modernist garden with sculptures by Miró, Giacometti, and Calder, as well as Bury’s fountain.

Fondation Maeght by J.L. Sert © THE MAEGHT FOUNDATION

‘A dwelling as a living organism’: Villa E1027 designed by Eileen Gray. © Manuel Bougot

The living room of E.1027, which features a replica of Gray's Bibendum chair and a Le Corbusier mural © Manuel Bougot

The nearby small town of Roquebrune-Cap-Martin contains two modernist architectural icons: E.1027, the house of Eileen Gray and Le Corbusier's Le Cabanon, a humble and rustic though no less modern cottage. Gray's summer home, built on an isolated stretch of the French Riviera between 1926 and 1929, is one of her most enduring achievements. Born into an aristocratic family in Ireland in 1878, her interest in art went beyond the boundaries of conventional expectations. Her screens, door panels, geometric rugs, and chairs made her one of the most influential architectural designers of the 20th century. She designed this sophisticated and utilitarian house so that inside and outside flowed together in a dynamic dialogue. This maison minimum, now completely restored, is simple and efficient and a fundamental contribution to modern architecture.

Gray ran in the same circles as the famous Swiss-born architect Le Corbusier who was a frequent visitor to E.1027. During one of his visits, Le Corbusier made the dubious decision to add his own touch to Gray’s masterpiece, painting large-scale murals on the walls with graphically sexual motifs. Whether from jealousy or as a prank on Corbusier’s part, Gray was furious and things spiraled down leading him to build his own summer home, Le Cabanon, on a nearby plot of land in 1951. In 1965, he died while swimming in the sea below both houses.

“Formulas are nothing,” she insisted, “Life is everything.”

Eileen Gray.

Le Corbusier Le Cabanon © Biber Architects

DIARIO 01, ISSUE 12

Cannes
Outside the Festival

Being in Cannes for the 72nd Film Festival is a great opportunity to visit the Côte d’Azur’s hidden gems, including the modernist house of designer and artist Eileen Gray.

Bonjour Tristesse (1958), directed by Otto Preminger. Film poster, designed by Saul Bass.

The Cannes Film Festival, along with New York and Berlin, is still considered one of the triumvirate festivals for all things film. However, it can be seen as the most iconic of the three as it is spread over the course of two weeks. Initiated in 1946, the festival was founded “to draw attention to and raise the profile of films, with the aim of contributing towards the development of cinema, boosting the film industry worldwide and celebrating cinema at an international level.” This year the 72nd annual festival takes place from the 14th to the 25th of May.

Behind the scenes at Bonjour Tristesse 1957 © Jean Seberg

Roger Vadim and Annette Stroyberg, Saint Tropez 1958 © Willy Rizzo

La danseuse créole, Henri Matisse, Musée Matisse, Nice, 1965

Elijah on a chariot, Marc Chagall (1961), mosaic installed on a wall outside the installation of the Biblical Message paintings, Museo Nazionale Marc Chagall (Marc Chagall National Museum), Nice, France

Apart from the artists, the area also attracted many writers, movie stars and socialites in the 20th century. The first wave, post World War I, included Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Nabokov, James Joyce, Gerald and Sara Murphy, and Coco Chanel. The second wave, post World War II, brought in the glitz and glamour of Hollywood, turning the artist and intellectual retreat into a playground for the rich and famous. Brigitte Bardot, Roger Vadim, Jane Fonda, Jane Birkin, and Serge Gainsbourg are only a few examples of the glamorous crowd that spent time on the sunny coast along with royalty and politicians, helping turn it into the opulent destination it is today.

The Côte d’Azur is a striking stretch of land where you can find over-the-top opulence living side by side with the charming villages that attracted artists and intellectuals and made this portion of the French Riviera a veritable art Mecca. Painters and sculptors were the first to call this place home. Pablo Picasso explored his passion for pottery when living in the clay-quarrying town of Vallarius where he also painted its main chapel, while Henri Matisse spent his last years in Nice and built a chapel of his own in nearby Vence. Nice has much to offer including the Musee Matisse, which houses an extensive permanent collection of the painter’s paintings, drawings, sculptures and personal items, and the Musee Chagall which was designed by the artist himself houses his series of 17 paintings illustrating the Message Biblique.

A ceramic mosaic by Fernand Léger from 1952 adorns the terrace of the "Colombe d'Or". © La Colombe d'Or

A mobile sculpture by Alexander Calder at La Colombe d'Or © Bernadette Marie

A short drive from the more recognizable destinations of Nice, Cannes, and St. Tropez, lies the small town of Saint Paul de Vence where you will find La Colombe d’Or. The rustically charming, family-run inn opened in 1931, first as a restaurant then a hotel. Artists were regulars here and donated masterpieces to adorn its humble premises in exchange for meals or lodging: works by Picasso, Matisse, Calder, Léger, Miró, and Chagall were donated by the artists and are displayed without fanfare. Though it began as a haven for artists, the boutique hotel quickly became popular with the stars as well, such as Brigitte Bardot, François Truffaut, Orson Welles, Charlie Chaplin, and David Niven.

The nearby Fondation Maeght, created in 1964 by art dealers Marguerite and Aimé Maeght, houses one of the largest art collections in Europe. The building was designed by Spanish architect Josep Lluís Sert as an interpretation of a Mediterranean village. Behind the small entrance gate you will find a modernist garden with sculptures by Miró, Giacometti, and Calder, as well as Bury’s fountain.

Fondation Maeght by J.L. Sert © THE MAEGHT FOUNDATION

‘A dwelling as a living organism’: Villa E1027 designed by Eileen Gray. © Manuel Bougot

The living room of E.1027, which features a replica of Gray's Bibendum chair and a Le Corbusier mural © Manuel Bougot

The nearby small town of Roquebrune-Cap-Martin contains two modernist architectural icons: E.1027, the house of Eileen Gray and Le Corbusier's Le Cabanon, a humble and rustic though no less modern cottage. Gray's summer home, built on an isolated stretch of the French Riviera between 1926 and 1929, is one of her most enduring achievements. Born into an aristocratic family in Ireland in 1878, her interest in art went beyond the boundaries of conventional expectations. Her screens, door panels, geometric rugs, and chairs made her one of the most influential architectural designers of the 20th century. She designed this sophisticated and utilitarian house so that inside and outside flowed together in a dynamic dialogue. This maison minimum, now completely restored, is simple and efficient and a fundamental contribution to modern architecture.

Gray ran in the same circles as the famous Swiss-born architect Le Corbusier who was a frequent visitor to E.1027. During one of his visits, Le Corbusier made the dubious decision to add his own touch to Gray’s masterpiece, painting large-scale murals on the walls with graphically sexual motifs. Whether from jealousy or as a prank on Corbusier’s part, Gray was furious and things spiraled down leading him to build his own summer home, Le Cabanon, on a nearby plot of land in 1951. In 1965, he died while swimming in the sea below both houses.

“Formulas are nothing,” she insisted, “Life is everything.”


Eileen Gray.

Le Corbusier, Le Cabanon © Biber Architects

DIARIO 01, ISSUE 12

Cannes
Outside the Festival

Being in Cannes for the 72nd Film Festival is a great opportunity to visit the Côte d’Azur’s hidden gems, including the modernist house of designer and artist Eileen Gray.

Bonjour Tristesse (title in italics) (1958), directed by Otto Preminger. Film poster, designed by Saul Bass

The Cannes Film Festival, along with New York and Berlin, is still considered one of the triumvirate festivals for all things film. However, it can be seen as the most iconic of the three as it is spread over the course of two weeks. Initiated in 1946, the festival was founded “to draw attention to and raise the profile of films, with the aim of contributing towards the development of cinema, boosting the film industry worldwide and celebrating cinema at an international level.” This year the 72nd annual festival takes place from the 14th to the 25th of May.

Behind the scenes at Bonjour Tristesse 1957 © Jean Seberg

Roger Vadim and Annette Stroyberg, Saint Tropez 1958 © Willy Rizzo

The Côte d’Azur is a striking stretch of land where you can find over-the-top opulence living side by side with the charming villages that attracted artists and intellectuals and made this portion of the French Riviera a veritable art Mecca. Painters and sculptors were the first to call this place home. Pablo Picasso explored his passion for pottery when living in the clay-quarrying town of Vallarius where he also painted its main chapel, while Henri Matisse spent his last years in Nice and built a chapel of his own in nearby Vence. Nice has much to offer including the Musee Matisse, which houses an extensive permanent collection of the painter’s paintings, drawings, sculptures and personal items, and the Musee Chagall which was designed by the artist himself houses his series of 17 paintings illustrating the Message Biblique.

Apart from the artists, the area also attracted many writers, movie stars and socialites in the 20th century. The first wave, post World War I, included Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Nabokov, James Joyce, Gerald and Sara Murphy, and Coco Chanel. The second wave, post World War II, brought in the glitz and glamour of Hollywood, turning the artist and intellectual retreat into a playground for the rich and famous. Brigitte Bardot, Roger Vadim, Jane Fonda, Jane Birkin, and Serge Gainsbourg are only a few examples of the glamorous crowd that spent time on the sunny coast along with royalty and politicians, helping turn it into the opulent destination it is today.

La danseuse créole, Henri Matisse, Musée Matisse, Nice, 1965

Elijah on a chariot, Marc Chagall 1961, mosaic installed on a wall outside the installation of the Biblical Message paintings, Museo Nazionale Marc Chagall (Marc Chagall National Museum), Nice, France

A ceramic mosaic by Fernand Léger from 1952 adorns the terrace of the "Colombe d'Or". © La Colombe d'Or

A mobile sculpture by Alexander Calder at La Colombe d'Or © Bernadette Marie

A short drive from the more recognizable destinations of Nice, Cannes, and St. Tropez, lies the small town of Saint Paul de Vence where you will find La Colombe d’Or. The rustically charming, family-run inn opened in 1931, first as a restaurant then a hotel. Artists were regulars here and donated masterpieces to adorn its humble premises in exchange for meals or lodging: works by Picasso, Matisse, Calder, Léger, Miró, and Chagall were donated by the artists and are displayed without fanfare. Though it began as a haven for artists, the boutique hotel quickly became popular with the stars as well, such as Brigitte Bardot, François Truffaut, Orson Welles, Charlie Chaplin, and David Niven.

The nearby Fondation Maeght, created in 1964 by art dealers Marguerite and Aimé Maeght, houses one of the largest art collections in Europe. The building was designed by Spanish architect Josep Lluís Sert as an interpretation of a Mediterranean village. Behind the small entrance gate you will find a modernist garden with sculptures by Miró, Giacometti, and Calder, as well as Bury’s fountain.

Fondation Maeght by J.L. Sert © THE MAEGHT FOUNDATION

‘A dwelling as a living organism’: Villa E1027. © Manuel Bougot

The living room of E.1027, which features a replica of Gray's Bibendum chair and a Le Corbusier mural © Manuel Bougot

The nearby small town of Roquebrune-Cap-Martin contains two modernist architectural icons: E.1027, the house of Eileen Gray and Le Corbusier's Le Cabanon, a humble and rustic though no less modern cottage. Gray's summer home, built on an isolated stretch of the French Riviera between 1926 and 1929, is one of her most enduring achievements. Born into an aristocratic family in Ireland in 1878, her interest in art went beyond the boundaries of conventional expectations. Her screens, door panels, geometric rugs, and chairs made her one of the most influential architectural designers of the 20th century. She designed this sophisticated and utilitarian house so that inside and outside flowed together in a dynamic dialogue. This maison minimum, now completely restored, is simple and efficient and a fundamental contribution to modern architecture.

Gray ran in the same circles as the famous Swiss-born architect Le Corbusier who was a frequent visitor to E.1027. During one of his visits, Le Corbusier made the dubious decision to add his own touch to Gray’s masterpiece, painting large-scale murals on the walls with graphically sexual motifs. Whether from jealousy or as a prank on Corbusier’s part, Gray was furious and things spiraled down leading him to build his own summer home, Le Cabanon, on a nearby plot of land in 1951. In 1965, he died while swimming in the sea below both houses.

“Formulas are nothing,” she insisted, “Life is everything.”


Eileen Gray

Le Corbusier, Le Cabanon © Biber Architects

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